1920s

  • 19 October 1920

    Charity’s first Charter of Incorporation received from HM The King

    The Chairman of the General Council, HRH The Duke of Connaught, received the charity's Charter of Incorporation, bestowed by HM The King.

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    The document encapsulated the Fund's objectives and values, but more importantly, gave full recognition to its work and continuing importance in the lives of British seafarers and their dependants. Seafarers UK holds an updated version of the Charter to this very day.

  • The war took a terrible toll on seafarers with 40,000 Royal Naval personnel killed, 3,000 merchant and fishing vessels sunk with the loss of 14,500 lives.

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  • 31 December 1920

    £900,000 raised by the charity

    A key focus for the Fund was to ensure continuing public support through fundraising activities and encouraging the take-up of regular subscriptions.

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    Support came from a wide range of sources, as individuals, businesses, trade associations, schools, churches and more contributed to the cause. By the end of 1920, the Fund had raised nearly £900,000 and allocated £214,000 to more than 90 individual maritime charities, with the rest in reserve for future need.

  • Maritime charities come together to help those affected by war; whether knitting clothes, providing compassionate support or volunteering with the Red Cross.

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  • 1928

    The Central Bureau of Naval Officers’ Charities set up

    The Fund sets up the Central Bureau of Naval Officers' Charities, a highly beneficial information service to help people in need to seek assistance and to avoid overlapping between the charities.

  • The Washington Naval Treaty concluded on February 6, 1922, limiting naval construction to prevent an arms race among the major nations that had won the war.

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  • 1928

    A Home Office white paper reveals seafaring as the most dangerous occupation

    Great progress had been made in safety for workers onshore, but in the words of the General Council in 1928 'no human can control the wind or waves'.

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    A Home Office white paper that same year revealed seafaring as the most dangerous occupation, with shipping making up the most claims under the Workmen's Compensation Act.

  • For fishermen and others still working at sea, the war was over. However, a sailor's life even in peacetime is a hard and hazardous one.

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